Saturday, October 25, 2014
Taris, the fastest 3-year-old filly in North America and recent runaway winner of Keeneland’s Raven Run S. (G2), has been supplemented to the Fasig-Tipton November sale on Nov. 3 in Lexington, KY where she’ll be offered by Darby Dan Sales...
Monday, October 20, 2014
2014 November sales consignments are red-carpet ready...
Sunday, October 12, 2014
Morning Tale ran her record to 2-for-2 with an electrifying head victory in a one-mile allowance contest for 2-year-old fillies...
Darby Dan adopts “Share The Upside” concept for American Lion
RSS Feeds Thursday, December 08, 2011


(click for larger image)

Darby Dan Farm will utilize the Share The Upside concept for breeders in 2012 with new stallion American Lion, the farm announced Wednesday.

The Share The Upside concept was introduced as a program by Spendthrift Farm's B. Wayne Hughes in 2010 in an effort to give breeders a vested interest in a new stallion as a bonus for the breeders' support of that particular horse during its initial couple of books at stud. It allows breeders to earn a lifetime breeding right in the stallion by breeding one mare on a stands and nurses basis each of the stallion's first two years at stud, with no bills or obligations going forward.

“Darby Dan has always had incentive programs to help our breeders,” said John Phillips, owner of Darby Dan Farm. “The Share The Upside concept is an innovative one that will benefit our breeders, and is a new way of doing business. Bill Casner and I are both very excited to offer a quality stallion prospect such as American Lion for 2012, while utilizing the Share The Upside concept as an opportunity for our breeders.”

Inspired by the need to give customers more value during a challenging time in the Thoroughbred breeding industry, the Share The Upside concept has proven to be very popular among breeders. It has become an industry trend that is increasingly being adopted by several other stallion farms in North America, although many have changed the program name.

“I always said that I would know that it was not a crazy idea when other stud farms began to do it as well, but the one mistake they are making, in my opinion, is changing the name,” said Hughes. “That is why I called John Phillips at Darby Dan and told him he was free to use the idea and name, and we both agreed that it was a movement for the betterment of the breeding industry. John and I share similar goals in that we want to help breeders the best way we can. We take it on as a responsibility.”